Posts tagged ‘2006’

Coldstream Hills Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon 2006 – what i’m drinking at the time 12.02.2012

Hey folks, been awol…again, but still kicking. Thanks to everyone who’s been checking in and hitting the “like” button on my posts, means alot 🙂 so I took out a little somethin somethin tonight, a little gem from Yarra Valley.

Coldstream Hills Reserve Cabernet Sauvignon 2006

Another side note, please excuse the picture today, I lost the bottle! I know, slack right? Had to scour the net for a half decent pic of this bottle and the fact that the picture changes for each vintage doesn’t make it easier. The bottle is in a bin somewhere so if I am able to source another bottle for a pretty pic, this post will get updated.

Ok, so whats up with Coldstream Hills. Coldstream Hills is a very solid winery out in the Yarra Valley originally (and maybe still) owned and opened up my James Halliday. I bought this bottle a year or two ago where we were served by a guy who we nick named “the white James Earl Jones”. Imagine JEJ saying “PEEE-NO” with that deep deep voice. Great guy. Classic.

The reserve wines are only made in the great vintages of the area. The cab sauv was first made in 1992 sourced from a 2.6 hectare block fermented in new French oak. You can pretty much find all the info you want on google for just click here.  Reserves are usually made to last for about 20 years. I made some chicken scratching on this bottle saying I can keep this till 2018. Lets go!

The nose was not as big and bold as I expected but you can still easily pick up black and purple fruits, think plums and black berries. There is also some mint thrown in there too.  The oak is not very upfront but makes it’s presence known. There is also some sour red fruits and some musk sticks – remember those lollies in the 80’s called “fags”? They are white sticks with a touch of red on one end and looked like cigarettes. There is definitely some of that in there.

The attack on the palate is lean tannins which transitions into lychee skin flavours. Randomly after the wine was all gone, we had lychee for dessert! I quickly peeled off the skin, wiped off the leftover juice and put it in my mouth. It was pretty spot on! The wine has a nice balance here because there is some ripe fruit sweetness with firm tannins and an acid backbone…and hits of dusted mint sugar? Does that even exist?

It finishes very very long, probably because the wine is so concentrated and gives the impression of a heavy wine (though it’s more medium bodied), some residual alcohol in the mouth but just heat and not the unpleasant burn. The tannins are still here and pleasantly tickling the inside of you gums. The sour fruits come in about a  minute after.

A solid, powerful and stong wine. Very ripe and very upfront with some overall softness to it also. It’s also a layered wine if you want to look for it. I think it would go great with big prominent sauces, thinking a garlic or maaayyybe a blue cheese sauce on a juicy steak. Downside is it’s $50 a bottle but it’s quite good. I’m 51% thinking that it’s a bargain buy.

Till next time, lets hope it’s sooner rather than later!

Kenny

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Louis Jadot Bourgogne Pinot Noir 2006 – What i’m drinnking at the time 2011.11.26

Hello everybody and wellcome to another edition of the “drinking show”. Today, we are revisiting France, specifically Burgundy.

Louis Jadot, Bourgogne Pinot Noir, 2006

12.5% alc/vol.

Burgundy, motherland of Pinot Noir. Pinot Noir from the Louis Jadot lable is a pure varietal wine produced from Pinot Noir musts and wines selected from village-level vineyard sites throughout the Côte d’Or and Côte Chalonnaise. As with several of their smaller wines (like this guy), Maison Louis Jadot practices a “réplis” to improve the quality of the wine by declassifying some wines of higher appellation to be incorporated into the blend. In other words, you get the BMW without the badge nor the price tag, a win win for the consumer.

We visited our friend Sophie and Richard and now their lovely bouncing baby William for dinner and we swapped their wine for our roast pork. The roast pork, as it turned out, was an excellent match for this wine.

The nose was light and airy, ethereal and thin layers of sour cherry, strawberry, yellow flesh plums and a background of liquorish. The initial attack on the palate was of dark fruits which lead into an aniseed, fennel seed, star anise combination (which is why it matched with the pork; we seasoned it with fennel seeds, coriander and thyme). The flavour followed into some sweet spices, dark berries and then into a barky tannin character with a firm acid backbone. Great mix of flavours and the wine and food bounced off the each other well. There was little to zero heat and the finish was long, spicy with a touch of a barnyard smell which is to my liking. I also noticed that the wine got a lot better and smoother as it sat in the glass but I should also say that your surroundings and mood does add to your enjoyment of the wine.

A very enjoyable wine especially with the meal and the company. It looked like little William wanted some too! At $30 bucks, maybe a touch expensive for a table/village wine but a great introduction and example to French pinot noir. I think I will always associate this with a family wine, very warming and loving.

Thanks again guys, till the next time.

Kenny

Thomas Hardy Cabernet Sauvingnon 2006 – What i’m drinking at the time – 23.11.2011

It’s Wednesday, and you know what that means, vino! Today we get to sample a Thoman Hardy from the Coonawarra Adelaide Hills areas.

Nice packaging, 13.5% alcohol and a coonawarra cab sav makes for some high expectations. This guy retails for about $100 bucks so lets hope it delivers!

Typical cab nose, red fruits, sour cherry and strawberry, maybe some blackcurrent? Some notes of lush green leaves, i’m thinking holly and some hints of kiwi fruit skin. There is also a sandy grainy aspect to this nose and makes you think of undergrowth.

Attack is somewhat bitter and takes it time to subside and mellow out. The fruit is not upfront, very much in the backgroung. The midpalate does spike in terms of fruit intensity but it’s short lived. Flows into a very tight but not omnipresent mix of tannin and acidity. Tannins definately kick in at the finish, the sides of your tongue and top gums are very grippy and there is a gravel, concrete mouthfeel, dusty dull and blunt finish. Tobacco bits thrown in the mix too with a sprinkle of acidity here and there as your mouth regains moisture. Extremely long finish with little to no heat and makes you want that next mouth full. Somewhat balanced (touch too much tannin) but I dont think its ready for drinking yet. The bottle says celler for 5-20 years and i’m inclined to say hold for at least another 5-7 years. As you drink the wine over time, it definately improves and more complexity and flavours come into play with more fruit forward flavours.

At $100 bucks a bottle, a soild wine especially for cellaring so not great for immediate gratification. I would spend money on some other wines at this price point but I can see others who enjoy this kind of profile easily spashing out on this.

Recommended for some, but as always make your own opinion and try try try!

Kenny