Posts from the ‘Burgundy’ Category

Mount Mary 2011 Vintage – What I’m Drinking At The Time 20.10.2013

MM Title

Mount Mary 2011 Vintage

 

Last year I was fortunate to attend the 2011 Mount Mary vintage release tasting. I gotta, say, if it weren’t for their recent website update I would have forgotten to posted this. For those who don’t know, Mount Mary is one of my favorite wineries who stay true to quality. I am lucky enough to visit them every year and hope to eventually have a long list of vintage to reflect on in years to come.

The 2011 vintage hasn’t been a strong one and I felt that the wines were a bit boardline and not up to their usual awesomeness. It felt that whist the wine making was exceptional, the fruit was a bit lacking. Mount Mary are known to produce a “second label” for bad vintage when quality is threatened so suffice to say, the experts think that the 2011 vintage is up to scratch. The go to wines for me were the Bordeaux wines; the Triolet, highly complex and well balanced with the Quintet looking like a wine to cellar for a little while yet. The Burgundy expressions were sorely missed.

 

2011 Mount Mary

The 2011 Mount Mary Lineup

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The Botanical – what i’m eating at the time 03.07.2012

The Botanical

Hello my fine dining friends, welcome back for another first class post. First, some housekeeping. Thank you to my newest mystery follower no. 23, much appreciated; you made my week!  Also, thank you to the people who left some posts in the comments section, again, I really appreciate the simple acknowledgement of my work and the time taken to say hello! 🙂

Ok, so back to the good stuff. Last week we had another “birthday cousin’s night” and following tradition (like our last outing) we hit up The Botanical. The Botanical was/is somewhat of a little icon in Melbourne. It recently had a significant renovation and now is a very swish looking wine bar and restaurant with decorated Executive Chef Cheong Liew. Cheong used to head “The Grange” restaurant at Hilton Hotel in Adelaide and has been given a Medal of the Order of Australia (OAM) for services in developing and influencing the style of contemporary Australian cuisine. His approach is adopting seasonal freshness and raw ingredients and breaking a few rules in between.

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Anglo French 100 Year War – what I was eating at the time 03.03.2012

The Anglo French 100 Year War Dinner

Top of the morning to ya govna and bonjoir! Today we get to visit the world of the foodies between France and England. But first, a little house keeping. Been super busy lately and haven’t had a chance to upload anything. So, better late than never, a big thanks to the peeps who have been hitting the like button on facebook and to my new followers “Spitting Optional“, “charlierobinson” and the email followers. Almost on to double digits! We are doing it people, we are doing it….so thanks thanks thanks and keep hitting that like button, better yet, type in your email on the right and hit follow. OK, onto the food!

The Hundred Year’s War was a series of wars waged from 1337 to 1453 by ze House of Valois (le French house of Anjou) and the House of Plantagenet (the English). The conflict not only changed Europe but forever changed the way we eat and drink blah blah blah. Welcome to My Kitchen Rules, the Master Class edition, where Gary and Manu explore the similarities that have adapted over time and have influenced Australian culture.

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What i’m eating at the time 10.12.2011 – Bistro Guillaume

Lovely sunny day today, especially when your eating at Bistro Guillaume.

Bonjour! A while back we received a crown voucher from my cousin in law’s Cam and Steve. Seeing as it was nearing it’s shelf life, we just HAD to use it, sigh, such a hard life we lead. Thanks guys, we owe you one!

We sat outside in the lovely sunshine greeted by some lovely (and cute, says Nat) actual french waiters in their lacrosse polos. Bonjour! We got to choose from a lovely and simple dinner selection which you can see here. Initially we were going to have different wines with entrée and mains but decided to go a bottle instead (persuaded by our waiter no less). We went the burgundy.

Bouchard Pere & File 2009 Bourgogne Reserve

I shall start with the wine. This is a Pinot Noir from Beaune in the Cote d’Or which is kinda known as the daddy of Burgundy. This is a Bourgogne which is the table wine of the region so expect nothing too amazing but still, expect the unexpected! Nose is musty and you get a bit of wet socks and cherries. Ummmm wet socks. It’s a very common smell you get from terroir driven Pinot noir, that barnyard smell. I do like it though others…maybe not. You also get a whiff of wet dirt and rock. Taste, the initial attack is a bit weak, some acidity and a touch of alcohol burn (which is bad), some kick of chilly and white pepper. The transition into the mid palate is more earthy, dark dark chocolate/coco or coffee beans with loads of cherries (think something like a dark chocolate cherry ripe but less sweet and more bitter and some lemon thrown in there). It has a grippy finish and you get some woody notes and bark.

I find this to be a very simple wine, nothing fancy but not a solid wine and a bit lacking in flavour and complexity. Good for a quick drink but at $70 a bottle (granted it’s a restaurant) I’m not impressed. Could definitely do with at least 1 hour of decanting as at the end of the meal, it gained more socks on the nose and more cherry ripe on the finish. Gotta love me some wet socks!

 OK, now for the real deal, the food!

The Charcuterie Plate

We started off with the Charcuterie plate to share and obviously some crusty bread and butter to lap things up with. Gorgeous entrée. Consisted of 3 different types of salami, sweet pate, pancetta, pork terrine and hock, cornichons with mustard, toasted bread and some greens. The pate was so so soft and creamy I couldn’t stop eating it. All the meats were well seasoned and a great great starter to the meal. Tres bien!

 

Steak frites with béarnaise sauce

Half a roasted chicken with paris mash and chicken jus

Green beans with confit of shallots

For main, I had the Steak (just edging out my usual french favourite of duck) and Natty had the roast chicken. We also ordered a side of green beans.  Steak, cooked perfectly. Soft but with firmness for added texture and just the right amount of chewyness. The chips were wow, almost melt in your mouth with a side of crispy. Chicken was silky smooth and the sauce matched well with the meal though a touch too salty. The best part of the dish (and the entire meal) was the paris mash. Ho-lee-crap. Best mash ever. Was so so smooth, creamy and buttered so well it was just bang on. Get this as a side dish, it will make you cry. Lets just say, we were pretty full and had to leave some chicken and chips but there was no sign of mash in site on the plate or the cutlery. Beans were a touch overcooked but still had a good crunch to it. A very plesent meal. I was happy but wait, there’s more!

  

 Desert du jour, Strawberry tart with vanilla biscuit and vanilla creme fraiche

Profiteroles with vanilla bean ice cream and warm chocolate sauce

Coffee with raspberry macarons

I blame Nat for encouraging my sweet tooth but thank you. I had the strawberry tart which was in a word…magic. Sweetness of the shortbread (and the crust…so so good) and the sourness of the strawberries was in fact just magic. I was in heaven with a side of chocolate sauce (I stole some). Natty’s desert was pretty good. What you expect if chocolate, dark chocolate (like coffee) and vanilla got together and made a baby. The macarons was actually pretty impressive, better than (I know it’s a big call) the macarons from Ladurée. There, I said it, google it up.

The food was very honest, warm and true. Defiantly ate too much and needed a wheelchair after this one,  you should try it sometime if you enjoy waking up with a food-angover.

Kenny

Bistro Guillaume on Urbanspoon

Louis Jadot Bourgogne Pinot Noir 2006 – What i’m drinnking at the time 2011.11.26

Hello everybody and wellcome to another edition of the “drinking show”. Today, we are revisiting France, specifically Burgundy.

Louis Jadot, Bourgogne Pinot Noir, 2006

12.5% alc/vol.

Burgundy, motherland of Pinot Noir. Pinot Noir from the Louis Jadot lable is a pure varietal wine produced from Pinot Noir musts and wines selected from village-level vineyard sites throughout the Côte d’Or and Côte Chalonnaise. As with several of their smaller wines (like this guy), Maison Louis Jadot practices a “réplis” to improve the quality of the wine by declassifying some wines of higher appellation to be incorporated into the blend. In other words, you get the BMW without the badge nor the price tag, a win win for the consumer.

We visited our friend Sophie and Richard and now their lovely bouncing baby William for dinner and we swapped their wine for our roast pork. The roast pork, as it turned out, was an excellent match for this wine.

The nose was light and airy, ethereal and thin layers of sour cherry, strawberry, yellow flesh plums and a background of liquorish. The initial attack on the palate was of dark fruits which lead into an aniseed, fennel seed, star anise combination (which is why it matched with the pork; we seasoned it with fennel seeds, coriander and thyme). The flavour followed into some sweet spices, dark berries and then into a barky tannin character with a firm acid backbone. Great mix of flavours and the wine and food bounced off the each other well. There was little to zero heat and the finish was long, spicy with a touch of a barnyard smell which is to my liking. I also noticed that the wine got a lot better and smoother as it sat in the glass but I should also say that your surroundings and mood does add to your enjoyment of the wine.

A very enjoyable wine especially with the meal and the company. It looked like little William wanted some too! At $30 bucks, maybe a touch expensive for a table/village wine but a great introduction and example to French pinot noir. I think I will always associate this with a family wine, very warming and loving.

Thanks again guys, till the next time.

Kenny

Circa – what i’m eating at the time 18.11.11

 
Friend of mine Eugene booked us a table at Circa in St Kilda last Friday and I was really looking forward to some good food, good wine and good company! His friend’s husband is the sommiler there so I was also hoping to pick brains. Nat, Eugene and I got there way way early so we decided to grab some bar snacks and something to drink; I packed in the water since I was feeling exhausted and wanted to make sure I didn’t pass out mid way through dinner (hey, it has happened before!)

We ended up getting some king prawns with green tea salt and saffron and mozzarella arancini. The arancini balls were meh, but the prawns were D-E-L-I-C-I-O-U-S! I picked at the salt flakes whist I drooled over the crazy wine list. make sure to have a look, there are some great stuff there. We hung around till 7.30 and then food team was assembled and ordered 1 a la carte and 4 degustations (of course) with matching wines. We had a choice of standard or premium wines and when premium…of course 😛 On to the rounds!

Warm miso glazed eel, pickled kohlrabi, avocado & apple

Vinoptima Ormond Gewurztraminer, 2006

Round one is a lovely glazed eel which was tougher than expected, however worked extremely well with the avocado puree and prawn cracker and this highly prized NZ Gewurztraminer was it’s white on rice. Nose was of creamy pear, like a full bodied cider withough the fizz. It matched the food perfectly, to the point that it seemed to be an extension of the food. The wine felt like the texture of the avocado puree and the eel was perfectly coated and finished off with a well rounded mouth feel. Best food and wine pairing of the night, but only just. A great start to the evening.

 Rabbit tortellini, morels, broad beans, garden peas

Bouchard Corton Charlemagne, 2000

If your a wine lover, you got to be excited about round two’s wine, a Corton Charlemagne. Oh and yeah, lets just throw 10+ years on that. What a treat. Such as exciting wine. White peach, mineral notes with some sea salts. The palate was granny smith apples, grass and straw. Odd, I expected more from this wine. However, add this to the food and BAM, imcredible. The food and the wine both bounced off wach other enhancing all the flavours, especially the jerusalem artichoke puree. The nose changed giving off a toffee/caramel aspect especially in the finish. The meal was not to be outshined and was personally my pick for the meal of the night. Delicate pasta and chunks of rabbit with an amazing sauce. A very close second/third in terms of wine pairing but will not complain, hell, I’m asking for seconds!

John Dory, mussel & clam risotto, sea urchin butter

Foster e Rocco Rosé 2010

Round three came with a rose from Heathcote made from 100% mourvedre which I thought was stange. Looking at the colour, you would not pick it to be rose, it had a strange golden/bark colour, almost like a sweet wine, nice and golden. Nose was extremely fresh and floral like potpourri. Beautiful acidity, subtle bitterness, some fruit balance. Reminiscent of a sav blanc. The fish was cooked well and the risotto was excellent, though I’m not sure it was regular risotto. It was almost like a fat sago, very smooth and almost bouncy. I liked it and the sea utchin butter was plate licking good. There was a downside to this dish, the food gave or enhanced a bitter finish to the wine. The wine did do a good job of cleansing the palate reading your mouth for the next bite, but you had a bitter taste in your mouth mading the wine not as enjoyable. We were able to snag another splash from our sommiler! I asked her about the pairing and she said it was more of a textural match and to also prepare your mouth for the red wines to come. After drinking the extra glass by itself, I think it got better over time, but matching the fish? I’m not so sure. Slightly dissapointed but we did come from a major high.

Suckling pig, salsify & ham beignet, spring garlic

Felton Road Cornish Point Noir, 2010

Another NZ wine, this time from Central Otago. This pinot had a great nose of red berries, cassis, brambles, and makes you think of dry and arid bushes. Palate has some white pepper balanced with some sweet Asian spices, cinnamon and paprika. Light to medium bodied, some enjoyable heat on back end but again, well balanced with a touch of acid. Nice wine! The pork belly was solid, though nothing special and I wasn’t a fan of the ham beignet, tasted a bit like spam! Perhaps we were spoilt with the previous dishes? The pinot did a great job of cutting through the fat both on the palate and the taste. Well done and a solid dish, lovely pinot and well matched.

Black Angus rump, bone marrow and oxtail brik, rainbow chard, creamed nettles

Clonakilla Shiraz Viognier, 2010

We drank the 2006 Clonakilla recently and was ranked last stacked against some heavyweight competition. After drinking this wine, it only shows the incredibly high calibre of those other wines. This is a great great wine and well done to such a young winery and vintage. Sniffy sniff opens with oregano, metallic notes and green peppercorns. The viognier comes through well, lifts the wine and brings out some floral sweetness. This wine has a juicy mouth feel, spicy mid palate of white and green pepper. Some caramel nuances also. Finish is a mix of interesting sweet alcohol with a touch of dry of the tip of your tongue, spicy and peperish but extremely well rounded and balanced. This wine matched the dish extremely well, virtually uplifts the entire dish to a new level. Exquisite, just edged out by the first dish, but phenomenal pairing and wine. I believe that the dish was the one playing the role of the backup dancer here and thats saying alot. The steak was excellent and I do love me some bone marrow. I jokingly asked the waiter for a second splash of this like the rose and guess what! I got one! yeah, we tipped 😛

 Salted caramel parfait, chocolate cake, honeycomb

NV Morris Classic Rutherglen Liqueur Tokay

Final round of the night was a treat. The sticky came with smells of honeycomb and port flavours. Not overpowering on the palate like a normal sticky, great mouth feel and balanced sweetness. Very impressive on its own. The dessert was gorgeous, both soft and cruncy and a effortless creamy texture on your mouth. With the dessert, the wine suffered and became overly sweet and somewhat unpleasant. It brought out the alcohol which made me want to finish the desert first then the wine or vice versa. Not a good match but great individually. Sipped that wine throughout the rest of the night with a smile on my face.

Circa was definatly an enjoyable experience. It was strangly loud in the rooms and had very funky ambiance with their own DJ. Very cool. The degustation will set you back $120 and then your choice of standard or premium wines at $85/$120. You will definately sleep well bring a wheelbarrow to roll yourself home.

Kenny

Circa, the Prince on Urbanspoon